RADIOS AND RELATED EQUIPMENT
RADIOS
AOR
Bearcat
General Electric
GRE
ICOM
OptoCom
Panasonic
Realistic
Radio Shack
Realtone
Sanchin
Sears
Toshiba
Uniden
Yaesu
Yupiteru
Zenith
 
ACCESSORIES
Heathkit
MFJ
Radio Shack
  After several requests I've put together this page to enumerate the various radios and other equipment that I've got in the shack.

RADIOS

AOR AR5000
Full coverage monitoring receiver.

A very good radio, with a good selection of bandwidths and step sizes. Can be computer-controlled and it has a discriminator output on the AUX connector. Also has a 10.7 MHz IF output on the back.

AOR AR8000
Full coverage handheld.

A fairly good performer, although mine could use a speaker mod to eliminate the audio cutting in and out that can occur.

AOR WX-2000
This is a radio facsimilie terminal that produces printed copies of radio fax signals, such as satellite weather maps.

Bearcat DX-1000
Desktop shortwave radio, 10 kHz to 30 MHz.

Like many owners, I'm looking for the Service Manual for this rig. So far all I have are the schematics.

General Electric Searcher
AC or battery-powered desktop radio, with AM, FM and Public Service Band (PSB).

Four-channel scanning in the VHF band.

GRE PSR-800
Handheld scanner capable of monitoring Project 25 Phase 1 and Phase 2 systems.

GRE America closed down in 2012 and in September 2013 the intellectual property rights were purchased by the Whistler Group of Bentonville, Arkansas.

ICOM PCR-1000
PCR-1000, computer controlled receiver about the size of a large paperback book. For data decoding fans like me the built-in discriminator output is nice.

ICOM bungled the release of the control protocol, but it's been reverse-engineered and is available on the Internet.

As with any receiver, it's important to have the right antenna for the frequencies you're interested in.

I recently purchased a UT-106 DSP Unit and will install it when I have some time.

ICOM R6
Very small handheld scanner.

ICOM R7100
Full coverage monitoring receiver. Mine doesn't see that much use since I got an R8500.

ICOM R8500
Full coverage monitoring receiver. The successor to the R7100. Solid performance, built-in discriminator output and 10.7 MHz IF output.

The "IF OUT" jack on the back panel outputs a 10.7 MHz IF signal with 9 V DC for external equipment.

I bought a second full coverage unit at the 2016 Dayton Hamvention.

OPTOELECTRONICS OPTOCOM
Computer controlled receiver.

Unfortunately, it's discontinued. It's a neat design -- a GRE receiver board interfaced to a computer-control board (controlled via a Winbond 8051 microprocessor).

Opto had planned to offer a series of add-ons to the receiver, but eventually had trouble getting boards from GRE in the small quantities that sales numbers dictated.

PANASONIC B65
Portable AM/FM/Shortwave receiver. This was purchased from a thrift store and works fine.

PANASONIC RF-085
Portable AM/FM/Shortwave receiver.

PANASONIC RF-2200
Portable AM/FM/SW receiver.

Very good sound from this receiver.

PANASONIC RF-888
Portable AM/FM/PSB receiver.
Coverage is 525-1605 KHz (AM), 87.5-108 MHz (FM), and 148-174 MHz (PSB).

This radio is still in the original box.

RADIO SHACK DX-342
Small, handheld AM/FM/shortwave receiver.

RADIO SHACK DX-360
Portable AM/FM/shortwave receiver.

RADIO SHACK DX-375
Portable AM/FM/Shortwave receiver.

Support documents can be found on Radio Shack's support web site, here.

RADIO SHACK DX-398
Portable AM/FM/Shortwave receiver.

Support documents, including a manual in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format, can be found on Radio Shack's support web site, here.

This radio is identical to the Sangean ATS-909.

RADIO SHACK DX-440
Portable shortwave receiver.
RADIO SHACK PRO-106
Handheld, APCO Project 25 trunk-tracking scanner.

RADIO SHACK PRO-2001
Early programmable base/mobile scanner.

RADIO SHACK PRO-92
GRE-designed and built handheld TrunkTracking scanner.
I have the first version and the B model (note the 'B' inside the box in the upper right corner of the right-hand photo).

I have a little more information about this scanner here.

RADIO SHACK PRO-94
1000-channel dual-trunking handheld scanner.

RADIO SHACK PRO-96
GRE-built digital (APCO-25) trunk tracking portable scanner.

I have more information about this scanner here.

REALISTIC DX-100
Desktop shortwave receiver circa 1980 - 1984.

Covers 550 kHz to 30 MHz.

REALISTIC DX-120
Early 1970's basic shortwave receiver.

For more information and photographs, click here.

REALISTIC DX-150
Late 1960's vintage GRE-built shortwave receiver.

You can read more about this model here.

REALISTIC DX-160
Early 1970's vintage GRE-built shortwave receiver.

REALISTIC DX-200
Five-band shortwave receiver.

For more information and photographs, click here.

REALISTIC PRO-23
4-channel crystal-controlled VHF handheld scanner approved by the FCC in 1982.

Coverage: 118-136 MHz and 144-148 MHz.

REALISTIC PRO-2006
400-channel desktop scanner manufactured by GRE.

Coverage: 25-520 MHz, 760-823.945 MHz, 851-868.945 MHz, 896-1300 MHz

The gaps in 800 MHz coverage are due to the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) which mandated that the FCC deny certification to scanners that could tune to these (at the time) analog cellular telephone frequencies.

Coverage could be restored by clipping a particular diode.

A quick guide to operations is available here.

REALISTIC PRO-2009
8-channel VHF/UHF desktop scanner manufactured by GRE circa 1995.

Coverage: 29-50 MHz, 144-148 MHz, and 410-512 MHz.

REALISTIC PRO-2011
Twenty-channel programmable base/mobile scanner built by GRE covering frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands.

REALTONE TR-970
A portable shortwave receiver.

Click here for more photos.

SANCHIN ELECTRIC COMPANY COASTAL NAVIGATOR
This is a Radio Direction Finiding (RDF) three-band marine receiver. It covers:
  • Beacons: 175 to 400 kHz
  • AM Broadcast: 550 to 1600 kHz
  • Marine: 1.6 to 4 MHz
I'm looking for a manual and a replacement extendable (telescoping) antenna for it.
SEARS RECEIVER 40
I know 11 meters isn't everyone's favorite band, but I thought this radio was interesting enough to pick up. It's an AM/FM/CB monitor with analog tuning, allowing the user to hear any potential interstitial transmissions. It also works well for receiving the audio from cheap wireless microphones.
TOSHIBA IC-700
I picked up this three-band portable receiver at a local hamfest. The end of the telescoping antenna is missing, but it doesn't affect the operation of the radio.

This model originally came out around 1971.

ELECTRA BEARCAT FIVE-SIX
Bearcat Five-Six.
Handheld five-band, six-channel crystal-controlled scanner.

Covers the following bands: 33-47, 118-136, 154-164 and 450-512 MHz.

UNIDEN BEARCAT 100XLT (BC100XLT)
Bearcat 100XLT.
VHF/UHF handheld scanner.
UNIDEN BEARCAT 200XLT (BC200XLT)
Bearcat 200XLT.
UHF, VHF, 800 MHz coverage (less cellular) handheld scanner.

UNIDEN BEARCAT 210XLT
Older desktop scanner.
UNIDEN BC245XLT
Bearcat 245XLT.

Full coverage (less cellular) TrunkTracking handheld scanner. Capable of computer control.

UNIDEN BC560XLT
16-channel base/mobile scanner with 'one touch' weather button. Covers 10 bands with the following frequency bands: 29 to 54 MHz, 137 to 174 MHz, and 406 to 512 MHz.

I bought this unit at a garage sale. When I plugged it in, instead of channel numbers, the two-digit display showed 'L'. I hit the [WX] button and immediately heard the local NOAA weather radio transmission. Hitting [SCAN] after that caused the scanner to run through all sixteen channels.

Apparently there are folks out there who get the 'L' display and are unable to proceed. If the [WX] doesn't work, try programming one of the 16 channels with a known frequency (NOAA weather frequencies are good for this: try 162.400 and 162.550 first). After receiving a good signal, manually step thorugh each channel - you should hear static if the squelch is set correctly.

YAESU VR-5000
Desktop receiver covering 10 kHz to 2.6 GHz (less cellular) with a 10.7 MHz IF output. This particular unit was manufactured in 2008.

I'm looking for computer control and cloning commands beyond the few CAT messages described in the manual.

YUPITERU MVT-7100
Yupiteru MVT7100 full coverage handheld scanner.

ZENITH TRANS-OCEANIC
Vacuum tube shortwave radio, model H500.

I need to get a spare set of tubes for this unit.

Does anyone have a good source for tubes, especially the 1L6, that aren't at a ridiculous price?

ACCESSORIES

HEATHKIT CA-1 CONELRAD ALARM
A relatively scarce Cold War device designed to prevent accidental transmissions that might guide Soviet missiles. You can read more about it here.
MFJ 959B ANTENNA IMPEDENCE MATCHER
Two antenna, two receiver impedence matcher.

RADIO SHACK DSP 40
Noise reduction via Digital Signal Processing.

Brief documentation is available from Radio Shack's support web site at here. The September 1998 Hints newsletter from the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) has the following modification:

Louder DSP with the RS 21-543 Box

Michael, N4TMI, has a quick fix for anyone trying to get more volume out of a Radio Shack 21-543 DSP box:
The cure is simple. The gain of the audio amplifier can be doubled by soldering wire jumpers across R54 and R57. These are clearly labeled 100-ohm chip resistors on the underside of the circuit board. According to the manufacturer's data sheet, the KIA7227CP audio amp chip does not require these components. Their only purpose is to reduce gain, apparently a bad idea in this situation. After the mod, it's much easier to get room-filling volume from a speaker. Sound quality is excellent, and digital signal processing is unaffected.
--Michael A. Covington, N4TMI, 285 St George Drive, Athens, GA 30606; e-mail mc@ai.uga.edu


Comments to Dan Veeneman

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Last revised December 30, 2016